ANSWERS TO QUIZ!

(scroll down to see the complete quiz)

Number one: b. Believe it or not, this Brit expression is: “I can’t be arsed”!!! For the longest time, I was saying, “I can’t be asked”. I thought it meant I can’t be bothered. At a fairly serious gathering, someone finally pulled me aside and told me I really shouldn’t be using that expression in such a setting. (I do love the comment below that suggested the “arsed” version is probably used in prison!)

Number 2: b. “He did it off his on bat” comes from the games of cricket and means doing something without they do it without anyone else suggesting it.

Numero 3: a. Out in the sticks. As in, in the middle of nowhere with the sticks and trees. Styx is a band.

Number 4: a. He immigrated to Ireland  You emigrate from and immigrate to.

Number 5: a. “Home in” means move towards a goal. (hone instead, mean to sharpen.  You can’t say “hone in.”)

Number 6: b. “bated” intimates suspense, holding your breath with anticipation. (Instead, “to bait”  = to taunt).

Number 7: a. “to whet your appetite” as  whet = sharpen or stimulate.

Number 8: it’s b. Since “prostrate cancer” would be cancer of lying face down on the ground! haha.

(Oh shit, there were a lot of questions.)

Number 9: b Due dilegence

Number 10: b. For all intents and purposes. (this one particularly irks our commenter below! Pet peeve!)

Number 11: a. moot not mute.

Number 12: b.  I nipped that problem in the budd, i.e. preventing the problem from flowering. Although I would LOVE to be able to say, “I nipped that problem in the butt.” That is just damn funny.

Number 13: Trick question! Gotcha! Both correct. Toward is North American; with the s at the end is Brit.

Number 14: b. Hunger pangs, i.e. sharp jolts you feel from hunger. As our commenter writes, it sounds similar so people started using hunger “pains.”

And for the final question, Number 15: This is another “believe it or not” one: it’s actually you got another “think” coming!! I used this incorrectly for years. It’s an eggcorn. See Merriam-Webster explanation. https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/usage-another-think-coming-or-another-thing-coming

 

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